KNITSONIK Blog Tour – part 2

Welcome to the second part of my interview with my dear friend Felix, who wants to create a knitting book that shows you how to turn everyday inspiration into gorgeous stranded colourwork. If you haven’t done so already, have a look at her Kickstarter campaign. I had to write this blog post earlier this week, and at time of writing, Felix had already reached her goal of £9000, and then some. As mentioned in yesterday’s post, when I spoke to her, she was so greatful for the overwhelmingly positive response she received, and she is now thinking about a new, higher goal, and exploring what she would like to use this additional money for. Be sure to check back at her Kickstarter campaign to find out more.

Yesterday we spoke about Felix’s fascination with provenance, locality and specificity of everyday objects, and her view on creating a contemporary and personal textile tradition. But I had more questions to ask, and Felix had more to say, so feel free to make a cup of tea before continuing to read about Felix’s approach to designing stranded colourwork patterns.

Huntley & Palmers Biscuit Tin and knitting pattern

Huntley & Palmers was a biscuit factory in Reading. They handed out samples of their biscuits in small tins like these. They probably never thought that one day it would provide inspiration for a tasty knitting pattern!

Tom: looking at textile traditions, I find there is a spectrum of specificity. For instance, cabled Aran jumpers are very generic, and you can just mix and match what you think looks good. There don’t seem to be too many rules. At the opposite end you can look at some Scandinavian traditions (Swedish, Estonian to name a few) where designs can be traced back to specific villages, and sometimes you can even work out marital status and other things about the maker/wearer. You also mention a few imaginative contemporary designs, inspired by specific places or buildings in your podcast “Finding the Fabric of the Place Part 2” Where does your sourcebook fit in?

Felix: The KNITSONIK Stranded Colourwork Sourcebook can be used in several ways. I wanted to make a book which could be useful to knitters on many different levels, and thought about how I use sourcebooks in my own knitting as a model for how to structure this one. There will be gorgeous pictures and lovely clear charts so that even just flicking through idly after a long day at work can be inspiring. There will also be nice juicy chapters which go into some depth and detail for the hungry knitter who is keen to more deeply understand the connections between places, things, plants and stranded colourwork. There will be both coloured AND black and white charts for the knitter who wants to either use or hack my charts for knitting from bricks, beer pump clips, vintage biscuit tins etc. and finally, there will be a rich how-to section which breaks the whole translate-everything-into-stranded-colourwork process into easy to follow steps.

In terms of your scale, you can go mega specific with it, taking ideas from the “how-to” sections and making your own extremely specific designs based entirely on things which only you own, or you can be far more general. Someone who lives nowhere near Reading may think the brickwork here looks great and decide to refer to the sourcebook to make their own brickwork-patterned sweater, or someone may adapt that concept a little or a lot to translating whatever building materials are popular where they live.

My main aim was to share the whole process in the book and then to leave knitters the choice of how deep to go into what’s offered.

Estonian Kihnu Stocking

Detail of a Kihnu stocking, which is an Estonian Island which has a rich textile tradition

Tom: restrictions or rules in designing seem to stimulate creativity in order to work around these rules. We found out during our Aleatoric Fair Isle that the contrast row in the middle of a pattern has certain rules to make it look good. Reading up about it, the contrast row came about because it was a way to incorporate a limited amount of yarn, or expensive yarn (e.g. because of the dye used). Nowadays we have don’t have these kinds of restrictions, but have you created any rules/restrictions nonetheless to stimulate creativity?

Felix: I would say the medium is in itself the restriction.

My background is (a long time ago) in painting and drawing, where colours are infinite and lines can go in any direction. When you’re painting, you have total freedom about how your image is built up; you have layers and can go in any direction with your lines. You are free to work in whatever order you like. I did a lot of oil paintings and murals for clients when I was in my late teens and early twenties, and I adored bold lines, mixing my own shades, and the limitless colour possibilities represented by paint.

In stranded colourwork, one must think in a totally different way. You necessarily have to build up the imagery line by line, and are restrained by the finite number of colours available to you from your yarn supplier. You have to think in bands and stripes, and also to imagine how the eye will wander over the end product in a way that is nothing like in a painting. Your ideas must repeat and have a rhythm, and you should be able to imagine this running on infinitely in horizontal and vertical directions. The really fantastic stranded colourwork of both Shetland and Estonia succeeds in giving you both discrete elements which you can get lost in, and an overall coherence of form. Finally, you are restricted in your line length by the architecture of stranded knitting itself; large columns of vertical stitches tend to pucker and long floats are undesirable as they tend to cause tension issues. Consequently the width of your motifs and the size of large colour areas must be most carefully considered!

For me, solving these problems – exploring how colours interact when knitted together; working with a finite palette; searching for ways of representing things which fit the structure of the medium; – all of these challenges are exciting. Creativity is about searching and problem-solving, and I love being restrained by the medium of stranded colourwork in my celebration of the world around me!

Tom of da Peathill Cardigan Swatch

A swatch made by me, showing how the limited palette of natural Foula sheep colours can create exciting Fair Isle patterns

Tom: last but not least, what particular joys will your source book bring to knitters around the world, and how can people help you out realising it?

Felix: I have hopefully answered the first part of this question already – the book will be a sumptuous feast of inspiration on translating your everyday world into stranded colourwork! It will also be a lovely thing to look through for ideas about how to work with the illustrious Jamieson & Smith palette; and it will provide an inspiring guide to some of the hidden treasures of Reading, while also giving you ideas about how to look on your own corner of the world with fresh, knitterly eyes.

I cannot produce this book without raising the necessary dollars to print it; if you think this is a book that you would really enjoy owning, you can go straight to my Kickstarter page and sign yourself up for a copy!

KNITSONIK stranded colourwork sourcebook

A possible design for the KNITSONIK Stranded Colourwork Sourcebook by Dr Felicity Ford

Dear blog readers, I hope you enjoyed reading this interview as much as I enjoyed had conducting it. I wish her all the best in realising her dream!

Other blog tour stops:

01/04/2014 – Jeni Hewlett
http://fibrespates.blogs.com/shop_blog/

04/04/2014 – Deborah Gray
http://perfectweatherforspinningandknitting.blogspot.co.uk/
AND
There is an interview with Brenda Dayne in the world famous Cast On Podcast

http://www.cast-on.com/

06/04/2014 – Lara Clements
http://inbetweendays.me.uk/inbetweendays/blog/

07/04/2014 – Jane Dupuis
http://spillyjane.blogspot.com

09/04/2014 – Hazel Tindall
http://www.hazeltindall.com/blog

11/04/2014 – 12/04/2014 – Tom van Deijnen
http://www.tomofholland.com

14/04/2014 – Deb Robson
http://independentstitch.typepad.com/

15/04/2014 – The Shop at The Old Fire Station
shopattheoldfirestation.blogspot.co.uk/ 
This blog post will coincide with Felix’s workshop there on this date entitled “FINDING THE FABRIC OF THE CITY”

16/04/2013 – Mary Jane Mucklestone
http://maryjanemucklestone.com/

18/04/2014 – Caroline Walshe
http://ansnagbreac.blogspot.com/

20/4/2014 – Fine Lightness & Kait Lubja
Finelightness.wordpress.com
http://katakoob.wordpress.com/

21/04/2014 – Donna Druchunas
http://sheeptoshawl.com/

25/04/2014 – Ella Gordon
http://jamiesonandsmith.wordpress.com/

26/04/14 – Lisa Busby
http://editionsofyou.com

26/04/2014 – Ella Austin
http://bombellablog.wordpress.com/

27/04/2014 – Susan Crawford
http://justcallmeruby.blogspot.co.uk/

2 Replies to “KNITSONIK Blog Tour – part 2”

  1. I love the trivia and history about the fiber crafts as much as I love the crafting part itself. I am going to have to put this book on my wish list as soon as it comes out!

  2. thank you! this is so inspiring. i have been waiting all my life for this, I think. I pledged and a blog tour, what brilliance

    On Sat, Apr 12, 2014 at 9:00 AM, tomofholland

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