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Posts Tagged ‘knitting in the round’

“I wish I knew how to knit socks,” “I’d love to be able to knit my own socks,” “wow, did you really knit those socks yourself?” “do you teach sock knitting?” are comments and questions I frequently hear whenever I run one of my darning classes or workshops.

KnitSocks

I’m happy to announce that in April, I will start my first sock-knitting short course!

This sock knitting course is aimed at the intermediate knitter, who already knows how to cast on, knit, purl, increase, decrease, and cast off. You may have knitted a sweater, but haven’t tried knitting in the round yet. I will teach you how to knit basic, well-fitting socks on double-pointed needles from the cuff down.

During the first session (Sunday, 14 April, 11am-1pm), you will learn how to knit in the round on double-pointed needles (also known as DPNs); a suitable cast-on technique for socks; and taking the right measurements. Then, when you get home, you can be confident to cast on the right number of stitches to knit the cuff and the leg.

During the second session (Sunday, 21 April, 11am-1pm), you will learn how to turn the heel. Although I’ve knitted many socks, I still find turning the heel a small miracle. I will also show you how to decrease for the toe. Again, I’d expect you to do some home work, and knit all the way to the toe.

During the third session (Sunday, 28 April, 11am-1pm), you will learn how to graft the toe closed. This technique is sometimes known as Kitchener stitch. We’ll discuss some common sock knitting pitfalls and you’ll leave with the confidence and knowledge to knit sock number two, three, four, and more!

Sock wool and a set of double-pointed needles are included in the price, as is a handy cheat sheet to refer back to techniques and to help record all the necessary numbers to continue your sock knitting adventures. All this for a mere £65! the classes are held at Super+Super HQ, Brighton.

You can sign up by following this link.

Sanquhar Socks

Socks with a Sanquhar-inspired design.

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In preparation for my Hand in Glove Workshop at Prick Your Finger, I have knitted a pair of gloves for my friend Howard. He liked my Sanquhar Gloves and houndstooth patterns, so I decided to throw them together. Although we will be knitting a plain stocking stitch glove for the Hand in glove Workshop, you still need to make the same measurements and calculations, so I tried out a few things for the workshop with my very patient friend.

Apart from trying on whilst knitting and using some stitch markers, there are various methods of trying to calculate the number of stitches needed to construct the fingers and I have tried out a few:

If you can’t try out whilst knitting, which was the very reason I wanted to make some gloves for somebody else I couldn’t readily meet up with, then I think that the maths provided in Hand-Knitting Techniques from Threads Magazine (although long out of print, try to get your hands on a copy, it has so many good articles in it) is your best bet.

After a reknitting the fingers three times (don’t ask), I finally produced some gloves I was happy with:

The back-of-hand shows a simple houndstooth pattern:

I say simple, but I did have difficulty getting the tension right for the row that makes the top of the brown check. Whatever I tried, the grey stitch immediately left to the brown stitch just disappears. However much I love my Shetland Spindrift, the sholmit (that’s the Shetland name for this particular colour of natural grey) was a bit thicker than the brown, which made even tensioning that little bit harder still. Luckily blocking has sorted most of it out.

The palm of the hand shows a check pattern I designed myself:

However, the thing I most pleased about is the cuff:

We have the wearer’s initials! We have a small split! We have i-cord edging! But best of all: we have cashmere lining! Even if Shetland wool softens considerably after washing and blocking, the cashmere is so much softer still, it gives a very luxurious feeling when you slip these on. I’m pleased to report that Howard loves his gloves. As the weather is turning cold again, I have no doubt he will be sporting them every day. As for me, I want to line the cuffs of all my gloves with cashmere now…

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When I posted about my Cornish Knit-Frock, I promised I would tell you a bit more about fixing a mistake and a nifty way of counting rows. Today I will do just that, and also want to share with you what I will do differently when I knit the next one, because I just know I will.

FIXING A PATTERN MISTAKE

When I had knitted about eight rounds of the patterns above the bars and seeds, I noticed that the chevrons in the middle, where actually not in the middle, I was one stitch off. I knew this was going to annoy me no end, so I decided to fix it. I could frog back eight rows, but I first wanted to try something else: I decided to drop down the offending area only, and knit it back up. If that failed I could always still frog back.

Here’s a picture of said offending area, one stitch out of kilter:

offending area

I carefully dropped back the stitches between the two garter stitch columns on either side of the upside down chevron (with apologies for the poor picture quality):

all dropped down

Then I used a pair of double-pointed needles one size smaller, to knit it all back up. This gets a little bit fiddly when you reach the end of the “row”, but that is why it is easier to use somewhat smaller needles. Also make sure you don’t mix up the strands that get tangled into egg noodles:

knitting back up

It didn’t take me too long before I had everything back in the middle. Definitely an easier fix than frogging eight rows!

all knitted up again

COUNTING ROWS WHEN YOU’RE NEARLY THERE

One of the things that I really don’t want to do when I’m doing some mindless knitting, is having to put down the knitting and measure, yet again, whether I’m nearly there for the ribbing to start. No, another 1/4 inch to go. So I had a brain wave after ingesting the eastern style knitting chapter in Mary Thomas’s Knitting Book (which, incidentally, has the best glove pattern ever) and a remark by Elizabeth Zimmermann about trying to keep progress when doing endless rounds of stocking stitch (possibly related to her pi shawl?). Once you are getting close to that point where you have to measure whether you have reached the right length, stop knitting a bit before you reach the end of the round. Now measure the length of your fabric and work out how much you have left to do.

Say, you are knitting a sleeve in the round and are 1 inch away from starting the ribbing. Now your row gauge is for example 10 rows (rounds) per inch. Here comes the trick: pick up your knitting and when you have ten stitches left to finish the round, knit that tenth stitch eastern style. In other words, wrap the yarn around the needle in the opposite direction you normally do (normally you would wrap clockwise, so eastern style you wrap anti-clockwise). This sets the new stitch up with the right leg at the back of the needle instead of the front. Continue knitting as normal. You will hit upon that weird tenth stitch and notice that you will need to knit it through the back loop to put it right again (if you didn’t knit this stitch through the back loop, it would show up as a twisted stitch). The next stitch, nine away to reach the end of the next round, gets knitted eastern style. Again, continue knitting as normal, and at near completion of the round, you will have to knit the ninth stitch through the back loop. Keep going like this and it won’t be long before the last stitch to be wrapped eastern style is also the very last stitch of the round. Voila, you are ready for your ribbing! I found this also works with purl stitches.

THE NEXT CORNISH KNIT-FROCK

When I will knit my next Cornish Knit-Frock, and I will, there are a few things I will do differently:

  1. I won’t bother with fancy seam stitches. A simple single stitch garter column is good enough for me, and it won’t curl under the stocking stitch.
  2. I will knit the whole thing in the round. No more separating front and back and peering over the needle to see what’s going on with the pattern. Instead, I shall knit steeks. It’s much easier to see what’s going on when you’re always on the right side of the fabric. I should’ve listened to Elizabeth Zimmermann.
  3. I will get myself a set of 40cm long double-pointed steel needles and a knitting belt or sheath. I broke two circular needles knitting my knit-frock. One broke at the join cable and needle as the fabric is heavy and it forces a sharp bend. Another pair got bent, as a knit-frock is knitted in a really firm gauge and manipulating the stitches puts a lot of strain on the needles.

What are your top tips and tricks for knitting ganseys?

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