Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘scarf’

Rachel Atkinson is a daughter of a shepherd, and in 2016 she launched a yarn range spun from the fleeces of the flock of sheep her father shepherds in Yorkshire. I enjoy working with wool produced on a small scale: you know where it comes from, how the sheep are looked after, and supporting small producers and makers in their endeavours. I was very enthusiastic about Daughter of a Shepherd yarn, and couldn’t wait to knit a jumper out of it!

Note: all pictures copyright with Rachel Atkinson/Daughter of a Shepherd, and used with kind permission

Daughter of a Shepherd Beginnings book cover

Daughter of a Shepherd, volume 1: beginnings

So when Rachel asked me to be part of her first book – Daughter of a Shepherd, volume 1: beginnings – I felt honoured. Little did I realise at the time that my enthusiasm had been so important to Rachel as validation of her project, which, when you read the book, you will realise took a lot of personal investment from her. I’m so pleased to see that Rachel has become a champion of small-scale wool producers. She now not only sells her own yarn, but also collaborates with others; not only limited edition yarns, but also a carefully curated selection of books, hand lotions and totes, amongst others.

Beilby Scarf in Daughter of a Shepherd yarn

My contribution to Rachel’s book: the Beilby scarf

Rachel’s Hebridean/Zwartbles yarn may be of the richest dark chocolate brown imaginable, it still shows up a nice stitch definition, and as I’m still enamoured by the Sequence Knitting technique, I thought it was worth exploring again in this scarf. In sequence knitting you repeat a simple sequence of knit and purl stitches over and over again to create complex textures. As with the Hexa Hap I designed for Kate Davies, I wanted to make something truly reversible, and in addition, strictly stick to the sequence I had devised for this scarf.

Beilby Scarf in Daughter of a Shepherd yarn

A sideways knitted scarf, with increase and decrease sections

The Beilby scarf is knitted sideways, divided into triangular sections separated by garter-stitch columns with a slip stitch to highlight the border between sections and columns. Although sections either end with a decrease in every row, or an increase in every row, the knit/purl sequence is the same for each section.

Beilby Scarf in Daughter of a Shepherd yarn

Cast-on and cast-off edges look the same, as do the slip stitch selvedges for a finished look

I used a cast-on technique that matches the cast-off technique, and these match the slip stitch selvedges, so all edges look the same and give the scarf a professional finish. This also means it takes some scrutiny to work out which way it was knitted, something I secretly take a lot of pleasure in!

BEILBY SCARF
Worked lengthways in long rows, a clever sequence-knit pattern repeat forms the triangular segments within this scarf.

SIZE
One size: 22cm / 8½” deep x 210cm / 82½” long

YARN 
Daughter of a Shepherd Hebridean & Zwartbles DK (DK / light worsted weight; 75% Hebridean wool, 25% Zwartbles wool; 233m / 255yds per 100g skein) x 3 skeins

TOOLS
• 3.75mm (UK 9 / US 5) circular needle, 150cm / 60” length
• 4mm (UK 10-9 / US 6) DPN or straight needle (for cast- off only)
• 4mm (UK 8 / US G/6) crochet hook for provisional cast-on
• 16 stitch markers – 8 of one type, 8 of another. These will be referred to as MA and MB.
• Smooth scrap yarn for provisional cast-on
• Tapestry needle

AVAILABILITY

The Beilby scarf is part of a collection of ten patterns, published in Daughter of a Shepherd, Volume 1: Beginnings. Hardcopy available here; PDF download available here.

 

Read Full Post »

Years ago,  when I just caught the knitting bug, I made myself a black brick stitch scarf. It’s a lovely scarf and very soft and comfortable, and I wear it a lot. In fact, I wear it so often, that I’ve started to get a bit bored with it. I no longer appreciate the looks of this scarf and the work I put in it. But what to do about it? I don’t really fancy knitting a new scarf, I don’t want to not wear it (if you know what I mean), and I most definitely don’t want to throw it out either. And yet, I’m bored with this scarf. It’s a classic case of Familiarity Fatigue.

I feel there’s only one remedy for this illness: a Fashion Intervention.

Regular readers of my blog know that I love my Shetland wool, and indeed you may have identified the two balls in the picture as Jamieson’s Shetland Spindrift. Here’s an excellent opportunity to combine my favourite wool with my once-favourite scarf.

In a random fashion I coloured in some of the ‘bricks’ with doubled-up Spindrift, using Swiss darning (also known as duplicate stitching):

I like the purl side of Swiss darning too. The purl nubs of the original black yarn and those of the coloured yarn create a striped effect.

I used three different colours here. Jamieson’s called them ‘surf’, ‘bracken’ and ‘burnt umber’. I think ‘surf’ and ‘bracken’ are particularly well-chosen names for these heathered tones of blue and green. I think the Shetland wool works really well here for various reasons: it provides a nice textural contrast with the supersoft merino/silk blend of the scarf. Then, of course, there’s the contrast between colours and black. In addition, as Shetland wool is quite ‘grabby’, so it was possible to weave in short ends, and not have to worry they will work themselves out again, especially after a burst of steam to set the yarn.

As the days are getting warmer now, I’m not sure if I will be wearing this scarf again until after summer. But once I have packed away this scarf, I have something to look forward to come autumn. I leave you with some close-ups of the scarf, as it caught the sunlight beautifully this morning:

 

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: