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Today’s Visible Mending Programme post is all about tape. And starting a Visible Mending Gallery. Let’s start with Tape: tape is a very versatile fixing material; as you will see in this photo essay. It can be used for many different types of instant repair: to keep something in place. To keep something out. To cover something up. To replace something. To stop something from happening. All the examples in this post are non-garment repairs, but  I have even seen white tape used on a yellow raincoat, but alas, I had no camera to hand.

And now for the Visible Mending Programme Gallery: for those of you who use Instagram: you will notice some pictures have been “instagrammed”. If you are an Instagram user, then you can follow me @tomofholland. Any mending pictures I upload I hash tag with #VisibleMend or #VisibleMending. It would be great if you did the same, I would love to see a gallery of Visible Mends.

But enough talking now, here is the photo essay on Tape. Red Tape. Brown Tape. Yellow Tape. Black Tape. Silver Tape. Clear Tape.

I’m looking forward to seeing your Visible Mending Pictures on Instagram. I hope to be able to use some prime examples for the presentation I will give at MEND*RS.

What, you haven’t heard about MEND*RS yet? It is the first mending research symposium in the UK (29 June – 2 July 2012). Registration will open soon, come join us in the Lake District for some mending action.

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Avid readers of my blog know that I run The Visible Mending Programme. On the whole I visibly mend clothes, but in recent weeks I have started to notice examples of Visible Mending in my surroundings. In my office, on the street, in shop windows, on shop floors, I see Visible Mending everywhere! The following examples of Visible Mending are particular favourites:

The Disused Airconditioning Unit Outlet:

Before we had our offices redecorated, one of the rooms was crowded with computers and servers and it was always very hot. So we used a mobile airconditioning unit and the big plastic hose was pushed through a hole made in the window pane for this very purpose. Once the redecoration was finished and the room had proper airconditioning, this was the Maintenance Department’s solution to close the hole in the window. The overlapping pieces of tape look like a star and I like how the light comes through the different layers, getting more opaque the more layers there are.

The Pub Built Around a Wall:

This pub in Brighton has seen most of its walls replastered, repainted, redone everything. But not the back. The contrast between the bricks and the smooth, painted walls works really well together.

The Shop Floor:

The shop floor of Laste, Brighton finest shoe shop, had some pesky floorboards. Alex (for whom I Visibly Mended a cardigan), did some Visible Mending of her own, with brass plates and nails. I particularly like the one right at the entrance. Trodden by many feet, it has acquired a great patina, but what is even better, slowly emerging is evidence of an earlier Visible Mend!

The Pavement:

Many pavements are Visibly Mended. This particularly fine example, as found on the way to work, not only shows a tarmac insert in the shape of the letter T, but also some pavement slabs made from a different stone than the original one.

The Accidental Stained Glass Window:

The other day I visited that most magnificent example of Arts & Crafts architecture, the Tudor revivalist department store, Liberty’s. The windows in the stairwell are constructed as stained glass, but with the strips of lead holding clear panes of glass. However, one of the panes got smashed and it got fixed with a small mosaique of glass pieces. One of them happens to have a grape vine painted on it, turning this window into an accidental stained glass one!

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Okay, maybe it won’t take me to Narnia, but whilst waiting to have collected enough wood to build an Enzo Mari wardrobe, I made a temporary and functional cardboard wardrobe. I used removal boxes and packing tape.

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